Alan Lomax – The Songhunter

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01 March 2019 | Alan Lomax Archive | YouTube

Alan Lomax was an American ethnomusicologist, best known for his numerous field recordings of folk music of the 20th century. He was also a musician himself, as well as a folklorist, archivist, writer, scholar, political activist, oral historian, and film-maker. Wikipedia


 

Musicologist, writer, and producer Alan Lomax (b. Austin, Texas, 1915) spent over six decades working to promote knowledge and appreciation of the world’s folk music.

He began his career in 1933 alongside his father, the pioneering folklorist John Avery Lomax, author of the best-selling Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads (1910).

In 1934, the two launched an effort to expand the holdings of recorded folk music at the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress (established 1928), gathering thousands of field recordings of folk musicians throughout the American South, Southwest, Midwest, and Northeast, as well as in Haiti and the Bahamas.

Their collecting resulted in several popular and influential anthologies of American folk songs, including American Ballads and Folk Songs (New York: Macmillan, 1934); Negro Folk Songs as Sung by Lead Belly (New York: Macmillan, 1936), the first in depth biographical study of an American folk musician; Our Singing Country (with Ruth Crawford Seeger) (New York: Macmillian, 1941); and Folk Song USA (New York: Duell, Sloan and Pierce 1947). Cultural Equality

See more videos from the Alan Lomax Archive on Youtube.

Hear 7,400 digital audio files, beginning with Lomax’s first recordings onto (newly invented) tape in 1946 and tracing his career into the 1990s here


Alan Lomax, with Phil Summerlin and Buell Cobb, discusses the emotional, historical, and musicological dimensions of Sacred Harp.

Lomax sees shape-note singing as characteristically American, places it in a global multi-melodic choral context, and predicts its increasing popularity.

Shot at the Holly Springs Sacred Harp Convention, Holly Springs, Georgia, June 6, 1982.

For more information about the American Patchwork filmwork, Alan Lomax, and his collections, visit http://culturalequity.org. [03.01.06]

Alan Lomax used this old field recorder to record tens of thousands of folk songs

 

ALAN LOMAX – Interview – “Remembering Leadbelly”

 

Appalachian Journey”, Alan Lomax (1991)

 

Lomax the Songhunter

 

New Britain,” better known as “Amazing Grace” (45t), sung by the 1982 Holly Springs Sacred Harp Convention; led by Mildred Dumas. Shot by Alan Lomax and crew using four quad-split cameras, Holly Springs, Georgia, June 1982.

 

Fillmore” (#434), sung by the 1982 Holly Springs Sacred Harp Convention; led by Kathleen Robins. Shot by Alan Lomax and crew using four quad-split cameras, Holly Springs, Georgia, June 1982.

 

Idumea” (#47b), also known as “And Am I Born to Die?), sung by the 1982 Holly Springs Sacred Harp Convention; led by Mark Brown. Shot by Alan Lomax and crew using four quad-split cameras, Holly Springs, Georgia, June 1982.

Original Link: Alan Lomax on the Sacred Harp (1982)

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