Satellite images show fake items left behind at Apollo 11 moon landing site

0486D876000003E8-5581909-image-a-4_1535560849298
Astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin unpacking experiments from the Lunar Module on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Photographed by Neil Armstrong, 20 July 1969

21 July 2019 | Megan Sheets | Daily Mail

Fifty years on, remnants from the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing are still visible on the moon’s surface, essentially frozen in time.

Without the threat of wind and water erosion we’re used to on earth, even the footprints left behind by the Apollo 11 astronauts are believed to still be cemented into the moon’s surface.

Buzz Aldrin described the moon’s ‘magnificent desolation’ when he and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to ever set foot on the lunar landscape that had set untouched for 4.5 billion years.

The astronauts left behind ample evidence of their expedition, some scientific and some sentimental.

They set up a camera, Laser Ranging RetroReflector (LRRR) and Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) to send information back to earth in the future and ditched some of the gear used to collect samples loaded back onto the Eagle spacecraft – along with excrement that had accumulated on the journey.

They also displayed several commemorative items, including a family photo, mission patches, medals for fallen astronauts, a silicon disk with messages from world leaders and an American flag erected in the frozen terrain.

The lander stage of the Lunar Module (LM) is also still on the surface.

Five decades later many of those items are still visible in satellite images taken from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, while no one has ever returned to the Apollo 11 site.

The clearest images of the Apollo 11 site were taken in 2011, showing the LRRR and its cover, the PSEP, the LM and the camera. The tracks the instruments made through the dust are also visible.

The American flag is no longer standing, having toppled to the ground the moment Apollo 11 lifted off.

Dennis LaCarrubba, who worked for the company that made the flag purchased off-the-shelf before the mission, said the nylon has since been bleached by the sun given that the moon has no atmosphere to protect it from UV rays.

‘Have you ever seen burnt newspaper from a fireplace? All the color is gone and everything,’ LaCarrubba told The Atlantic. ‘That’s probably what the flag would look like now.’

While the first flag isn’t visible in satellite images, other flags placed at later Apollo landing sites appear to have been bleached as well.

For years scientists thought the sun exposure would destroy the flags completely, but the photographs taken in the last decade show that the emblems endured.

LROC’s cameras don’t capture enough detail to make out astronauts’ boot prints, many of which were likely erased in the liftoff blasts.

16309302-7269745-image-a-14_1563719962157
Fifty years on, remnants from the inaugural 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing are still visible on the moon’s surface in satellite images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. This 2011 image is one of the clearest ever taken of the Apollo 11 site 

 

16309300-7269745-image-a-15_1563719962165
The Apollo 11 astronauts left behind ample evidence of their expedition, including a camera, Lunar Module (LM), Laser Ranging RetroReflector (LRRR) and Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) to send information back to earth in the future. Several of those instruments, as well as the astronaut’s trail to the Little West Crater in the Sea of Tranquility, are still visible. The 2011 satellite image above shows the Apollo 11 site along with a photo taken during the expedition

 

16310440-7269745-image-a-13_1563719962152
Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, the first humans to ever set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, are seen erecting an American flag on the lunar landscape. The flag fell as soon as the astronauts departed, but it is believed to still be sitting at the site

 

16310444-7269745-image-a-17_1563719962249
Without the threat of wind and water erosion we’re used to on earth, even the footprints left behind by the Apollo 11 astronauts are believed to still be cemented into the moon’s surface. Buzz Aldrin is pictured during the expedition

 

16310454-7269745-image-a-20_1563720602192
While the American flag erected at the Apollo 11 site isn’t visible in satellite images, other flags are seen at later Apollo landing sites. They appear to have been bleached of all color by the sun because the moon has no atmosphere to protect from UV rays

 

16310420-7269745-image-a-12_1563719962119
No one has ever returned to the Apollo 11 landing site, where Aldrin is seen next to the Solar Wind Composition experiment. The SWC was part of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASAP) at Tranquility Base on the surface of the moon

 

16307154-7269745-This_March_30_1969_photo_made_available_by_NASA_shows_the_crew_o-a-21_1563720745087
The Apollo 11 crew is pictured prior to their landmark expedition in March 30, 1969. Pictured left to right are commander Neil Armstrong, module pilot Michael Collins and lunar module pilot Edwin E ‘Buzz’ Aldrin

 

Original Link: Satellite images offer a glimpse of the bleached American flag, astronaut boot prints and lunar equipment frozen in time at the Apollo 11 landing site 50 years later

join the Hawkins Bay Revolution
before it is too late
Read

by

James Porteous
who does not receive any
financial remuneration
from these stupid
Word Press ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s